Jason Millar

bio-jason

Right now, Jason is probably drinking coffee. He is also a PhD student in the Philosophy department at Queen’s University at Kingston. His interests lie at the intersection of ethics, technology and society. His current research focuses on applied ethics and science and technology studies, with particular interests in design ethics and the (bio)ethical issues surrounding robotics, transhumanism and the human-machine merger.

Jason earned a B.Sc. in Engineering Physics from Queen’s University and worked as an engineer for several years prior to earning a B.A. and M.A. in Philosophy at the University of Ottawa. While at the University of Ottawa he worked for several years on On the Identity Trail, a multidisciplinary SSHRC funded project, researching some of the ethical and policy issues surrounding privacy in the digital age. While completing his M.A. Jason also worked as a technology policy analyst at the Office of the Privacy Commissioner of Canada. He has published a book chapter on privacy in the first ever Oxford University Press publication licensed under the Creative Commons. That chapter can be freely downloaded. He has also written on engineering ethics and the policy implications inherent in the design of technology. He maintains the Ethics, Technology and Society blog.

RESEARCH INTERESTS

  • Jason is attempting to navigate the intersection of technology and ethics. It’s a busy intersection. The Identity Trail, Ian’s fantastic project, examined it through the lenses of privacy, identity and anonymity. His current research focuses on applied ethics and science and technology studies, with particular interests in the democratization of science and technology and the (bio)ethical issues surrounding robotics, transhumanism and the human-machine merger.

PUBLICATIONS

  • Millar, J. (2009). “Core Privacy: A Problem for Predictive Data Mining”, in Lessons from the Identity Trail: Anonymity, Privacy and Identity in a Networked Society, Ian Kerr, Val Steeves, Carole Lucock (Eds.), Oxford University Press. 103 – 119.
  • Millar, J. (2008). “Blind Visionaries: A Case for Broadening Engineers’ Ethical Duties”, IEEE 2008 International Symposium on Technology and Society Conference Proceedings, IEEE Explore (Online)

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